Lee Valley Tools    Gardening Newsletter
   Vol. 7, Issue 4
    June 2012
   Interesting Reads

Excerpt from American Agriculturist, Volume 28, 1869

Supports for Tomatoes

In the family garden it is almost impossible to get along without some kind of support for the straggling tomato vines. That the necessity for this exists is shown by the numerous devices that have been sent to us, and which have from time to time been published. The latest thing of this kind comes from L. L. H. Terrebonne, La., and is shown in figure 1.

Fig.1  Rack for tomatoes.

The rack is 10 feet long, and 3-1/2 feet high. If the ends of the legs which go into the soil are covered with coal tar, the frame will last several years. A friend of ours, who is a tomato fancier, uses racks made of common laths, nailed to rough inch stuff or even common bean poles, and put together tent fashion, as in fig. 2.

Fig.2  Lath support for tomatoes.They may be tied together or fastened by a bit of wire. The superior quality of the fruit and the greater ease with which it can be gathered will abundantly repay the small amount of labor required to provide some kind of rack or trellis.

Editor's Note: This is a reprint of an article published in 1869.
It describes what was recommended in accordance with the knowledge and practices of the day. While reading it, please consider this fact.

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