Lee Valley & Veritas

 Gardening Newsletter
 
  Volume 8, Issue 11 - November 2013    
 
Interesting Read
Excerpt from Reflections on the Fungaloids by B.L. Williamson, Algrove Publishing, 2002.

The Family Boletaceae: Leccinum Chromapes, Aurantiacum, and Insigne

Leccinum Aurantiacum & Insigne

The dazzling colours and pointy leggings of the Leccinum on these pages (chromapes, aurantiacum and insigne) may blind one to the fact that they have neither gills nor traceries; their undersides have the look of plump, blank pillows, a look typical of the Boletaceae which, as a family, presents a somewhat muffinish persona. (Indeed, clusters of tan Boletes in the woods can seem strangely out of place, like buns or cupcakes strewn about, as if a chef enragé had just dumped his fresh baking all over the forest floor!) However, their interiors are much more complex than bread dough; they contain what may be the most high-tech and productive little spore factory in all Fungodom.

 
  Leccinum Chromapes
Instead of increasing their soporiferous surface by means of gills (the knife-like pleats of the Agarics), the Boletes roll their substance into tiny parallel tubes, lined with spores in the hundreds of thousands, all packed under the Boletan cap as tightly as rods in a reactor. (Unpleated, unrolled, flattened out, which, pleats or tubes, would present the larger spore-bearing surface?)

Whatever, none of the brilliant Leccinum on these pages could ever be mistaken for muffins!

Like most Boletes, all these are strongly tree-addicted, Leccinum aurantiacum insisting on the company of Aspens.

A note from the book's publisher: In today's litigious world, products (including books) are often accompanied by a list of disclaimers that exceeds the attributes. This book has one primary disclaimer: it is not intended to be used for identification of mushrooms. (Leonard G. Lee, Ottawa, August, 2002)

 
 
 
 
     
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