Lee Valley Tools    Woodworking Newsletter
   Vol. 5, Issue 1
   September 2010
 
   From the Archive
 

Excerpt from Popular Mechanics: Shop Notes, Volume 16, 1920.

Setting a Lag Screw in a Hole Containing a Broken Point

Setting a Lag Screw in a Hole Containing a Broken Point

When a lag screw breaks off in a hole and cannot be readily removed, another screw may be set securely in the same hole by the method illustrated. The threads are dressed off the new screw with a file, and with a hacksaw the point is split a distance equal to the depth to which it would normally enter the wood. The points are then spread slightly and the screw driven home with a hammer. When the points of the new screw strike the broken piece they will spread out, taking a firm hold in the wood. Care should be used to cause the new screw points to spread with the grain of the wood to avoid splitting.

—Walter H. Wolf, Londonville, Ohio

Editor's Note: This is a reprint of an article published in 1920. It describes what was recommended in accordance with the knowledge and practices of the day. While reading it, please consider this fact.
 
     
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