Lee Valley Tools    Woodworking Newsletter
   Vol. 6, Issue 5
   May 2012
 
   The Reconstruction of a National Historic Site
 

Framework
Another historical photo showing the framework

Fitting A Pegged Mortise and Tenon Joint
Mortise-and-tenon joints were used in all of the structures. Commonly, oak pegs or treenails were incorporated to make beam joints tight. Workers drilled holes through a mortise 2" back from the inside surface. They fitted the tenon into the mortise, marked the positions of the holes, and then drilled holes in the tenon roughly 1/8" closer to the shoulder, so that when they drove in pegs, they pulled the two members tightly together. As the wood dried, the oak pegs kept their resiliency longer than the pine and thus maintained pressure in the joint.

Pegged mortise-and-tenon joint   Pegged mortise-and-tenon joint
Some examples of the pegged mortise-and-tenon joints
 
 
             
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